Paul Manna, Collision Course: Federal Education Policy Meets State and Local Realities

Paul Manna, Collision Course: Federal Education Policy Meets State and Local Realities (Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2011)

You may order a copy of this book here.

Reviewed by Kevin R. Kosar

This website is devoted to the history of federal education policy. Manna’s study of the No Child Left Behind Act is not a history of the law.  Those wanting a sense of the political wrangling that produced NCLB ought to look here.  So why bother to mention this book on this website?

Simple—Manna’s book instead focuses on the administration of education policy—a critical and often over-looked part of federal education policy.

Put generally, policy-making and policy analysis are highly regarded in the U.S.  Plenty of universities have well-funded, high profile policy schools that funnel wonks into government. Politicians, meanwhile, may seize the mantle of statesman or law-maker (Solon!) by crafting  sweeping legislation.

Continue reading “Paul Manna, Collision Course: Federal Education Policy Meets State and Local Realities”

Advertisements

No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

President George W. Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB; P.L 107-110; 115 Stat. 1425) on January 8, 2002.  NCLB is a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA).   The original ESEA was 32 pages long; NCLB is 670 pages long.

The full text of the No Child Left Behind Act is accessible in the window below, and you also can see and download it at http://www.scribd.com/doc/49332318/No-Child-Left-Behind-Act-of-2001.